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The Business of Gaming

Wednesday, September 10, 2008   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Elaine Miller
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Gary Rosenzweig,
President, Colorado Game Developers Assoc.; President, Clevermedia.org


Gary introduced himself and explained that the Colorado Game Developers Association is also part of the International Game Developers Association. He also confessed to being a Mac bigot. Gary began his discussion by presenting the question: how has gaming changed the Internet?


  • Who are gamers?
    • consumers of information on the internet
    • developers
    • early adopters

  • What is different about gaming?

    • Tell stories
    • Interactive; old media = passive;
    • gamers demand to interact with information
    • Web 2.0 is all about interaction

      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • You Tube
      • Second Life

  • Gaming and IT have a parallel life

    • gaming started in the '70's and early 80's
    • Video games collapsed in mid-80's
    • It was a technology that grew up too fast. They made more ET game cartridges than the total number of Atari machines in production and expected the demand for the game to create an ever-increasing market.
    • With Nintendo evolution games are being taken seriously. (i.e. Playstation, Xbox)
    • There is a "gaming generation gap" and age 40 is the dividing line.


  • Gamers have a different way of interacting with information

    • Click on everything
    • Trial and error is ok way to learn
    • Information MAY be misleading
    • Gamers control the environment (i.e. World of Warcraft)
    • Gamers interact with other players. In the early '90's, early web sites were passive. Web 2.0 is interactive. YOU control everything.

      • Comments
      • Forums
      • Choosing your information (i.e. Yahoo portal = myYahoo, iGoogle)
      • RSS feed led to development of creating custom content without having to build a website. RSS feeds are aggregators to create content on the page.
      • RSS may take the place of email


    • Choosing other people's information

      • Slashdot - site made you the editor. Communtiy editing tool.
      • Digg - simpler than Slashdot. Not as much editorial. Driven by "friends". Content is promoted based on voting. Kevin Rose, the founder of Digg, is a gamer.

    • Creating your own information - "all about me"

      • Blogging
      • You Tube
      • Services are FREE, but advertising is allowed. Even Facebook allows vendors to pay for Facebook pages and sponsored ads within pages. Facebook doesn't spam your email inbox. (Very like Linkedin)
      • Hosted on private networks so the bots can't harvest emails or personal data.
      • Wikipedia - pop culture
      • Twitter (micro-blogging). Limited to 40 characters. Similar to instant messaging.
      • Second Life is virtual reality but is not technically a game. Lindens (the economic medium of exchange do have an exchange value tied to the US dollar). Businesses and schools are using Second Life as a platform for corporate training. Metro State has a proposal in to buy/establish their own island.
    • Web 3.0 - What will gaming and the Internet become?

      • Trends: innovative controllers (i.e. Wii, XBox, Guitar Hero)
      • Trends - new devices: iPhone multi-touch screen
      • New level of content creation: XBox Live - downloadable games
      • Open Social (Google)
      • Games appealing to a larger audience. Currently divided between hard-core gamers and casual gamers (i.e. Bejeweled). Becoming more relevant and accessible to more people. Outside the US, it's through cell phones rather than on computers.


presented to Mile High Chapter, AITP, November 15, 2007


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